Fly on the Wall Sunday: Dangerous Obsessions

The blog hop ended yesterday and I did draw the winner. The winner is Kathryn Anne Merkel. Congratulations.

Now, onto the Fly on the Wall Sunday post. This week I talked a lot about the double standard in writing. Sorry, I don’t have any heavy guy stories to share with you all, but I will share Dangerous Obsessions.

I think anybody who actually analyzes while they read, and even those who don’t, could probably notice that Clair, my fitness expert, seems to fill her life with things that are about fitness and nutrition that keeps her busy. As a psychology major myself if Clair were my client one thing I would notice is that her dip into the world of fitness trainer and health really became prominent when the one person who stood by her, and the one person she had left in her life that she loved, decided to exit her life.

One can say that Clair found the world of fitness and nutrition and made it her home. There is the one place where she fit. Fitness and health and exercise and nutrition are the only things that couldn’t be taken away from her and wouldn’t walk away from her. So I think the events in her life amplified some of her passion for her career. She’s good at what she does too so that helps.

Dangerous Obsessions Print Cover

In Dangerous Obsessions Clair McPhee has survived her abduction when she was a teen. Her sister was not so blessed and the death of the youngest child ripped an otherwise seemingly healthy family apart. They say the death of a child will either bring a family together or rip it apart and for her family it ripped it apart.

Greg Harland, the federal agent, who was close friends with the family, and her ultimate crush as a teen, was the one constant in her life. He was the man she loved with all her heart and knew that he wouldn’t desert her like both of her parents did. But one fateful day Greg walked away from her doorstep and he didn’t look back. Ten years later, when the man who abducted Clair and her sister has broken out of prison circumstances drive Greg back to Clair’s home. The woman he finds isn’t the young woman he left alone, lost, and afraid of the world around her. She’s stronger. She’s stubborn, and she’s not so happy to see him.

Excerpt:

“We haven’t seen each other in ten years. I was unaware that we were on familiar terms.” The distance had been entirely his fault. She had called him a few times, but he never returned the calls. She sent him a letter that went unanswered too. She could take a hint, especially one that was written so clearly. He had obviously wanted her out of his life. The truth was he wouldn’t be standing in front of her now if Levins hadn’t escaped from prison.

“I’ve been busy.”

“For ten years?” She shrugged. “Well, agent—”

“Greg,” he supplied in a curt tone. “Just in case you forgot.” The thin line his lips were starting to form told her he was angry, very angry, about her formality.

“If you insist—”

“I do.”

“Greg,” she stressed. She didn’t remember the man being so annoying, but right now he was working her nerve. “I can’t take you and your shadow with me everywhere I go. I have work.” He did know what that was right? Just because she wasn’t a federal agent saving the world it didn’t make her job any less important than his.

“So do I.”

He saw her as work. Great, this wasn’t even a friend helping a friend, this was work for him. “I…”

“After Janet insisted you wouldn’t go willingly I made some calls. I’ve already arranged being at your gym. I came prepared.” He seemed rather satisfied with himself. She didn’t doubt his preparedness because the Greg she knew was always prepared for the possible outcomes, no matter how numerous those possibilities were.

So you see, Clair might be willing to let Greg inside her house, but getting back inside her heart—now that is a near impossible mission. Grab your copy of Dangerous Obsessions to see how the story plays out for these two.

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